All Courses

  • HIST5392-001C-1177

    Are riches something that accrue infinitely to the benefit of everyone, or must they always be concentrated in the hands of the few? Why do we believe these things to be true, and how did we come up with these rules? This course will interpret economists as writers informed by their own historical time. Reading their work in this research seminar will help advanced undergraduate and graduate students to develop their own understanding of the principles upon which the discipline of economics rests. Read original excerpts from Adam Smith, John Maynard Keynes, F. A. Hayek, and other individuals responsible for formulating the rules of capitalism.

  • HIST5392-002C-1177

    Students will learn text mining and analysis methods that can be applied to any field. To give some examples, the methods can be used where the meaning of words and phrases in a body of text must be compared across many instances of speech. For example, a philosopher could compare the number of occurrences and co-occurring words around the stem "sense-" (sensible, sensate, sensitive) in Locke, Smith, and Hume. A scholar of religion could compare the idea of "community" as used by scholars before and after Augustine. Or a psychologist, sociologist, or anthropologist could count references to "me" and "mine" against "you" and "yours" in tweets or text messages within a particular community, group, or sample. Or the student can generalize about the major discussions in the Journal of Xxx in any field, asking, for instance, how the proportion of discussions dedicated to women and minorities changed before and after 1972.

  • HIST3380-001C-1177

    Text Mining teaches methods applicable to any field where the meaning of words and phrases must be compared across many instances of speech. For example, a philosopher could compare the number of occurrences and co-occurring words around the stem "sense-" (sensible, sensate, sensitive) in Locke, Smith, and Hume. A scholar of religion could compare the idea of "community" as used by scholars before and after Augustine. Or a psychologist could count references to "me" and "mine" against "you" and "yours" in tweets from a particular community. Or the student can generalize about the major discussions in the journal in any field, asking, for instance, how the proportion of discussions dedicated to women and minorities changed before and after 1972. Text mining allows a scholar to add quantitative measurement to any field where semantic analysis is at the core of an argument.

  • HIST5340-001C-1177

    Are riches something that accrue infinitely to the benefit of everyone, or must they always be concentrated in the hands of the few? Why do we believe these things to be true, and how did we come up with these rules? This course will interpret economists as writers informed by their own historical time. Reading their work in this research seminar will help advanced undergraduate and graduate students to develop their own understanding of the principles upon which the discipline of economics rests. Read original excerpts from Adam Smith, John Maynard Keynes, F. A. Hayek, and other individuals responsible for formulating the rules of capitalism.

  • PRAC-TXT-MINE

    Text Mining teaches methods applicable to any field where the meaning of words and phrases must be compared across many instances of speech, adding quantitative measurement to any field where semantic analysis is at the core of an argument. The course presumes no prior knowledge of coding but will rapidly take students up to a point where they can analyze text on their own. Our textbook begins with word counts in Jane Austen, and by the end of lesson one we'll be comparing Austen's lexicon with Brontë's. Students will quickly proceed to quantifying how particular keywords and key phrases co-occur in the text. By the end of the session, students will know how to teach a computer to statistically identify a "topic" of words that frequently co-occur across many texts. We will visualize word counts as bar graphs, pie charts, frequency plots, and heatmaps, allowing students easily to generalize their findings into presentable evidence. These skills will place students well on the way to discerning, with quantitative tools, how discourses change over time, and making quantitative claims about the most important terms, authors, or events in a changing discourse.

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